Manual Steak Diana Ross: Diary of a Football Nobody

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Steak Diana Ross: Diary of a Football Nobody file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Steak Diana Ross: Diary of a Football Nobody book. Happy reading Steak Diana Ross: Diary of a Football Nobody Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Steak Diana Ross: Diary of a Football Nobody at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Steak Diana Ross: Diary of a Football Nobody Pocket Guide.

Days of mud and blunder

We've detected you're shopping from Finland, so we've set this as your delivery location. You may see a reduced selection of products. If your location is incorrect, please click on the country in the site menu above to change it. Deals Brands. Sell Account. Your email address has been submitted - we'll be in touch.

Cicero: v. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

Community Reviews. Showing Rating details.

Review: Diary of a Football Nobody - Mansfield and Ashfield Chad

More filters. Sort order. Shelves: read A lighthearted look at English lower division Football in the 70's.


  • S.O.S.: Students of Sherlock Short Mysteries 1-6 (Students Of Sherlock Short Mystery Collections).
  • Kundrecensioner;
  • Temptation: An Erotic Fairytale (Erotic / Paranormal Short Story).
  • DREAMS OF A PAST LIFE (The Forgotten Seer of Edenhope Thriller Series Book 1)?
  • Diary of a Football Nobody – The Tears of a Clown;
  • Bless Yo Heart: The adventures of Dilbert & Ellie May;
  • Negative Co-Receptors and Ligands: 350 (Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology).

David Mcvay, a player for Notts County chronicles a bygone era in which players trained in garden sheds and often had second jobs during the close-season. The diary format gives the book an intimate feel, and many times the reader will be surprised at how ordinary the life of a footballer could be. The love of the game these players had seeps from every page. For those who lived through these years, this book is a nostalgic time- A lighthearted look at English lower division Football in the 70's.

source url For those who lived through these years, this book is a nostalgic time-capsule. For those who came to the sport during the premiere league era, it serves as a great reminder that football wasn't always about flash cars, WAGS, and clothing lines.

Follow by Email

Read the book and then see the play. Nov 27, Simon rated it liked it Shelves: sport. Just a light read. I bought it and read it because I'd enjoyed the stage version at Nottingham Playhouse. I bought tickets for that because I'm on the mailing list. See; advertising works. Nice to have a football biography that is actually written by the footballer, and one that isn't just another no good at school but really good at football bore fest. This is funny, entertaining and quite touching at times. And for those of us who are about the same age, a good nostalgic wallow.

Dec 09, Graham rated it really liked it. An era that seems a million years ago from modern day footballers! Oct 29, Mark rated it really liked it. I'm biased. Stefan Berehowskyj rated it really liked it Oct 27, Then pints of ale, now vodka and whatever.

Then the pub, now some trendy bar. Then the local slapper - the only difference nowadays being a tattoo and, maybe, a pierced navel. The diary reads as if Mr McVay resisted the temptation to refine his observations, and maybe he was right. There is a rough edge to his diary that reinforces its immediacy and credibility. His observation of an old pro, Willie Carlin, playing out his days in the reserves is both compassionate and vivid: "He would get undressed in front of the old electric fire in the corner of the home dressing room. It was hard to imagine the fear and awe he could generate on a pitch.

David McVay now works as a journalist covering sport. I only hope there is someone equally observant and clear eyed keeping a diary about life in the Premier League. It would be the perfect companion to Mr McVay's funny and fascinating document.